Back to top

An online blogof a web developer.

4 great photo resources for clients

When you get to the content stage of your new website, a lot of unexpected costs can pop-up. More often than not, clients won’t necessarily have their own image library to choose from when populating the site, and this can be quite a costly exercise if you don’t know about some of the more secret corners of the internet! The big hitters for stock photos (iStock, shutterstock etc.) could see you spending as much as £20 an image, and even the subscription packages work out at £5-8 per photo. There’s two sides to this; 1) It’s expensive, and 2) There’s a lot of pressure to pick the right image, knowing that if you get it wrong, you’re going to have to fork out a fair chunk for another photo.

Read More

Client Work: Alsta Watch Company

This is the first of a new addition to the blog. A client case study. I’ve deliberated long and hard over where to place these on the site, but it ultimately felt natural to include them as part of the blog.

Read More

Sleeping with technology

Quick disclaimer, if you’ve arrived at this article expecting content related to going to bed every night alongside your laptop or tablet, i’m afraid you’ve come to the wrong place. I’m actually looking to discuss the affect that technology, or more to the point, using technology has on your ability to then switch off at night and go to sleep.

Read More

5 ways to improve your site on mobile

A mobile site and how it works is becoming more and more important. Google now split mobile and desktop rankings into two separate mesaurements, and not only that, but the weights of attributes are different. For example, poorly optimised images on a desktop machine hold a far smaller penalty than it does on mobile devices. Here’s 5 relatively things you can do to improve your site on mobile, and score higher up in Google.

Read More

The iPad pro; how will it affect web development?

At the beginning of September, Apple announced the iPad Pro, it’s latest iteration of the massively successful line of tablets. The iPad pro shares a lot of similar features to it’s predecessors, offer a powerful, yet portable touch device. However, where it differs from the iPad Air is it’s whopping 12.9″ retina display. This is just 0.4″ short of the 13″ retina Macbook Pro display size (which is 13.3″ diagonally across the screen), so we’re essentially dealing with something in size that has previously been reserved for laptops and notebooks.

Read More